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Setting up redhat RHEL 3,4,5,6,7
 
http://pbraun.nethence.com/unix/sysutils_linux/redhat.html
http://pbraun.nethence.com/unix/sysutils_linux/redhat-networking.html
http://pbraun.nethence.com/unix/sysutils_linux/redhat_rhel6.html
http://pbraun.nethence.com/unix/sysutils_linux/redhat_rhel7.html
http://pbraun.nethence.com/unix/sysutils_linux/systemd.html
 
Post-installation
Basically:
- network setup & remote access
- deliver ssh public keys in place
- yum conf against local repository and install,
yum groupinstall core
yum groupinstall base
yum install curl elinks ksh lftp nfs-utils ntp mc screen wget
& screen config
also get latest EPEL
- open-vm-tools if it's a VM
- disable firewall
- selinux permissive
- lvm mount points...
- enable ntp & hwclock --systohc
 
Network setup
NetworkManager style with either RHEL6 or 7, e.g.,
TYPE=Ethernet
BOOTPROTO=static
NAME=em1
DEVICE=em1
ONBOOT=yes
IPADDR=10.0.X.X
NETMASK=255.255.X.X
GATEWAY=X.X.X.X
DNS1="X.X.X.X"
DNS2="X.X.X.X"
DNS3="X.X.X.X"
DOMAIN="domain1 domain2 domain3"
 
Updating the system
You can always use yum to get the latest minor version and patches,
yum update,
and remove older kernel & headers (keep the current one and the new one of course),
uname -r
rpm -qa | grep ^kernel
rpm -e
 
You can even enable auto-updates,
on RHEL you need to subscribe to the optional channel first,
yum repolist all
subscription-manager repos --list
subscription-manager repos --enable=rhel-7-server-optional-rpms
#subscription-manager repos --disable=rhel-7-server-optional-rpms
yum -y install yum-cron
vi /etc/yum/yum-cron.conf
vi /etc/yum/yum-cron-hourly.conf
systemctl start yum-cron
systemctl enable yum-cron
refs.
How to install 'yum-cron' package from RHN ?
How to enable/disable a repository using Red Hat Subscription Manager?
Is yum-cron auto-update mechanism safe for production systems?
http://www.certdepot.net/rhel7-configure-automatic-updates/
#eventually run it once manually (otherwise enabled by default /etc/cron.daily/0yum-daily.cron),
#/usr/sbin/yum-cron
on CentOS,
yum -y install yum-cron
cd /etc/sysconfig/
cp yum-cron yum-cron.dist
vi yum-cron
ref. http://linuxaria.com/pills/enabling-automatic-updates-in-centos-6-and-red-hat-6
 
You may then check the very exact version of your system doing,
cat /etc/redhat-release
rpm -qa | grep release
Ref. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4140219/how-to-confirm-redhat-enterprise-linux-version
 
Until RHEL6
Ctrl-alt-suppr (sysV)
Prevent ctrl-alt-suppr from restarting the box,
vi /etc/inittab
comment that line,
#ca::ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t3 -r now
 
To change language's locale,
vi /etc/sysconfig/i18n
 
To get everything through serial console, configure GRUB and inittab.
Ref. http://www.faqs.org/docs/pocket_linux/x1252.html
 
RHEL5 specific
LVM2 fix
On RHEL5, to avoid a little warning at boot time about CDRom not having volume labels,
cd /etc/lvm/
cp lvm.conf lvm.conf.dist
sed '
/^[[:space:]]*$/d;
/^[[:space:]]*#/d;
' lvm.conf.dist > lvm.conf
vi lvm.conf
change,
filter = [ "r|/dev/cdrom|" ]
 
RHEL5 installation numbers
They're supposed to simplify deployments in environments with different subscriptions. However, it's just a pain for non supported Redhats. Here are a few working install numbers as a workaround,
Client,
0000000e0017fc01
Server,
000000e90007fc00
Server with Cluster,
00000065000bfc00
Server with ClusterStorage,
000000ab000ffc00
Server with HPC,
000000e30013fc00
Server with Directory,
000000890017fc00
Server with SMB,
00000052001bfc00
Refs.
http://linuxczar.net/projects/rhel-installation-numbers/
http://linuxczar.net/blog/2007/03/18/installation-number-followup/
http://linuxczar.net/blog/2007/03/17/red-hats-installation-numbers/
#broken http://linuxczar.net/moin/RHEL_Instaltion_Numbers
#broken http://www.redhat.com/support/resources/faqs/installation_numbers/
 
RHEL4 specific
RHN
If using the real Redhat (not CentOS), register your system to RHN. For RHEL4,
rhn_register
 
Huge memory
RHEL4 had the hugemem kernel but it wasn't recommended to use it even though you had 64Go+ of RAM. Today RHEL5 is fine with default kernel, althouth HP says it runs with max 64Go in its OS compatibility table.
 

Last update: Apr 22, 2016